The Salvation of ‘Napalm Girl’

Summary: “You may not recognize me now, but you almost certainly know who I am. My name is Kim Phuc, though you likely know me by another name. It is one I never asked for, a name I have spent a lifetime trying to escape: “Napalm Girl.”

Read more at: https://goo.gl/XUtJ3n

Digitally mined from: www.wsj.com

HH

 

Ursula K. Le Guin on Art, Storytelling, and the Power of Language to Transform and Redeem

Read more at: https://goo.gl/zqJAzq

Digitally mined from: www.brainpickings.org

 

How the Founder of American Evangelicalism Was Felled by Dirty Magazines

Read more at: https://goo.gl/EmLzok

Digitally mined from: www.christandpopculture.com

 

Meditating on Altered Carbon

I have been working on my own thoughts on this series but since they’re not completely finished at this time I thought I would share an article on this series from a blogger I often read. Here is a summary of his article:

For those who have not yet taken a look at the new Netflix sci-fi show, it is based on a 2002 novel by Richard K. Morgan about what might today be called a transhumanist culture where people’s consciousness is recorded into what are called “stacks” and inserted into different bodies. Originally intended to be a means of space exploration (transfer your consciousness to a body light years away without having to physically cross space), it ends up being used to create a man-made version of immortality.”

Read more at: https://goo.gl/S2aZFR

Digitally mined from: http://bloodofprokopius.blogspot.com

 

Rod Serling: human rights activist as science fiction showrunner

Rod Serling’s activist views on human rights were embodied in The Twilight Zone, drawing on the practice of using fantastic fiction to evade social constraints, in the tradition of Gulliver’s Travels (to say nothing of books like Pinocchio and Inferno).”

Read more at: https://goo.gl/YKsjHH

Digitally mined from: http://www.boingboing.net